Wednesday, 19 December 2012

3d images: Correcting the Vray and mental ray self-illumination display in the viewport




The following tutorial assumes that the user has a basic knowledge of 3Ds Max when applying textures to the self-illumination toggle; applying the “UVW map” modifier and assigning material slots to objects/surfaces.

Also, check my New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max

When using a bitmap in the “VrayLightMtl” or mental ray “Self Illumination (Glow)” toggle, the texture display is often overridden by its default colour swatch (i.e. white) in the viewport.


or





The viewport artifact occurs even when the “Show Standard Map in Viewport” button is enabled in the “Bitmap” parameters.





It’s also worth mentioning that this problem is only specific to 3Ds Max 2012 and 2013.

This current “bottleneck” is a major setback to users trying to tweak the bitmap to fit a specific area of a surface while using the “UVW map” modifier.





So far, some users resort to numerous unpractical solutions to overcome this hurdle.
The practical approach frequently used by most professionals to correct this viewport artifact, is to simply change the self-Illumination default colour swatch, to 100% black.

This “trick” will enable the self-illumination texture to automatically become visible in the viewport, for both Vray or mental ray.



or








I hope you have found this tutorial useful.

Ta


My 3D Portfolio:

New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max


More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

Creating a velvet/suede material 

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree










.

Tuesday, 11 December 2012

3d: Creating customised IES web lights for vray or mental ray




The following tutorial assumes that the user has a basic knowledge of creating and using “VRayIES” and “Photometric” lights parameters.

Also, check my New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max

While “Photometric” and “VRayIES” lights are used to load the IES web files, the following tutorial will focus mainly in customising IES web files through the use of “Creator IES” software, as opposed to general photometric light functionalities.

This ingenious piece of software was created by Karba, and can easily be found and downloaded by simply googling the following: ies creator download

I personally couldn't find more details about the creator/Author, therefore resorting to google in order to download the software.

The WinRar Zip file shouldn’t be any bigger than 202 kb in size.
Once unzipped and installed, simply place its icon on the desktop, and double click it to open its dialog box.






Professionals frequently choose this software to create unique IES light patterns that differ from the commonly seen/used by most artists/visualisers.

Please note that, in real projects, users are strongly advised to ask for permission from the designated lighting designer before using this artistic approach!

The “Creator IES” dialog provides users with the unsurpassed ability to create IES web files “from scratch”, or by simply editing a loaded one.

Its dialog box consists of two representations of the light pattern:
Curve editor graph, and picture thumbnail.





The Curve editor depicts a graph of the IES light pattern (i.e. red line). The entire length of the curve represents different parts of the light pattern, which can be easily edited by simply clicking and dragging (upwards or downwards) on any part of the curve.

The adjacent picture thumbnail depicts the resulting image from the curve editor shape, in real time.

The “before and after” images below highlight how the “Creator IES” software can easily and intuitively create an IES web file “from scratch”.





Below are some of its core parameters:

Area of editing- This function sets the type of editing by simply dragging its target slider either to the left, or to the right.

The default value is 1.0. Values below 1.0 yield sharp light patterns when the curve graph is edited.

Values above 1.0 yield softer light patterns when the curve graph is edited.




Brightness- This function sets the intensity of the IES light pattern by simply dragging its target slider to the left, or to the right.

The default value is 1.0. It’s worth noting that, this function’s values are for previewing purposes only; therefore will have no impact on the shape or intensity of the relevant light being used in the 3D scene.


In order to physically increase or decrease the brightness/intensity of the IES web file, users are required to do it directly in the 3D scene.







Away from wall- This function depicts the light pattern shape against a surface/wall depending how close/tight the IES light is away from it, by simply dragging its target slider.

Values above 1.0 increase the gap between the IES light patterns while dimming it.

Values below 1.0 yield opposite effects, with brighter results. It’s worth noting that, this function’s values are for previewing purposes only; therefore will have no impact on the shape or intensity of the relevant IES light being used in the 3D scene.

Save- This toggle allows users to save the edited IES file, by simply clicking on its icon.





Load- This toggle allows users to load an IES file from a location, by simply clicking on its icon.

Reset- This button enables users to reset the edited/ loaded IES file, by simply clicking on its icon.

After creating and saving the IES web file, go to the 3D scene and load it in its respective toggle and render the results.
It’s worth mentioning that the IES light object may change its shape depending on the IES light parameters.






Please note that, every time a change is made and the IES file is re-saved, users are required to re-load the file in the 3D scene in order for changes to take effect in the render.

The first 3D render below depicts a space lit with a standard/common IES web file used by most artists.





The second and third 3D render depict a customised IES web file.







P.S: To download specific IES light data for a client, please visit the following websites:


ERCO

Philips 


I hope you have found this article somehow useful!



My 3D Portfolio:

New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max


More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Realistic materials

Creating a velvet/suede material 

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree




.

Sunday, 2 December 2012

3ds max: Creating a “Velvet/Suede” finish with Vray or mental ray






After few requests to post a tutorial about creating a velvet/suede fabric finish, I have managed to put something together.

The following tutorial works for both V-Ray and mental ray.

Also, check my New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max

One of the most distinctive characteristics of the velvet/suede finish is its soft textured effect with two contrasts that transcend across the entire surface. This effect is more noticeable on the edges/rim of the surface.

Note: This tutorial assumes that, the user has already applied a base texture to the diffuse toggle.
To source for a good velvet/suede texture, simply Google (image search): velvet texture

Alternatively, to find seamless high resolution textures, simply visit: www.arroway-textures.com 
One should be able to find a nice high resolution texture under, suede category.


To emulate this material, simply do the following:


1- Go into your existing “Diffuse” map toggle first.

Or






2-In the “Diffuse map” parameters, click on its “Bitmap” toggle to access the “Falloff” procedural map from the “Material/Map Browser” dialog. Double click to select it.




3-The “Replace Map” dialog should be prompted. Choose to “Keep old map as sub-map” and “OK” to close the dialog. The “Falloff parameters” should be loaded.




4-With the “Falloff parameters” loaded, one can clearly see its exquisite effects from the material slot thumbnail.
The next phase is to create two variations of the same material in order to emulate the previously described “finish”.
The “Color Correction” procedural map is one of many tools that can help achieve that:

In the “Front: Side” group, click on the “Front” toggle to access its “Bitmap” parameters; followed by clicking on its “Bitmap” toggle to choose the “Color Correction” map from the “Material/Map Browser” dialog. Also, choose to “Keep old map as sub-map” option when the “Replace Map” dialog is prompted.




5- This procedural map offers a number of ways to control the texture. One of the most popular methods used by numerous companies is to scroll down to the “Lightness” rollout and enable the “Advanced” function.
Its parameters should come to life. Reduce its “Gamma/Contrast” “RGB” value to about 0.7 to darken its texture.

It's worth noting that, this value worked well for the desired effect. However, one can try different values, if desired.




6- The next step is to use the same procedural map for the “Side” toggle, with reversed effects (i.e. brighter texture).
To do so, simple go back to the “Falloff Parameters” by clicking on the “Go to Parent” button first. In the “Falloff Parameters”, drag the “Front” toggle contents and drop it onto the “Side” toggle.
The “Copy (instance) Map” dialog should be prompted; choose the “Copy” option and “OK” to close the dialog.
The “Copy” option was chosen because its parameters will be later changed.





7- Next, go inside the “Side” toggle and increase its “Gamma/ Contrast” value to about 2.0.

Please note that this value worked well for the intended results. However, feel free to try different values, if desired.




8-Finally, to ensure that the falloff is visible on the edges /rim of the surface, simply change its “Falloff Type” to “Fresnel” and render the results.




The two 3D renders below depict the “Before” and “After” effects  using the “Falloff” procedural map on the diffuse toggle.

I hope you have found this tutorial helpful!



  
                                NO "Falloff" procedural map being used





                                With "Falloff" procedural map being used




I hope you have found this article somehow useful!



My 3D Portfolio:

New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max


More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree







.